nobody wants a home thats too noisy especially not nj architects

photography by Lisa Russman

When you imagine your dream home, it’s not always exciting to dream about sound-proofing or the element of noise, right? Unless you have toddlers, then you’re probably pretty excited about this. But for most, the concept isn’t something many examine when it comes to building a new home. That’s why it is so crucial to work with a team of NJ architects who understand the science behind the noise and how to save you from it in the long term. We feel it’s critical to arm you with important details now so you can have a voice in every element of your home’s design. 

 

Noise Pollution 

First, let’s quickly break down one of the two main sources of noise so you can position your home to avoid external sources of the racket.

Outside noise otherwise known as noise pollution is a long term source of noise and is basically defined as the sound of anything unpleasant to your ears. Here’s a list of some of the sources:

  • Trains
  • Traffic
  • Cars, car horns
  • Airports
  • Buses
  • Stadiums
  • Firehouses
  • Police stations
  • Schools
  • College
  • Church or any large gathering place
  • Fast food restaurants

It’s important to know about these outside noise sources so when you build your home you can position it in such a way to avoid hearing as much of it as possible. Here are a few things you can talk to NJ architects about.

Positioning. Knowing where these sources of noise are in relation to your property can help your architecture team know where to place your windows to mitigate that problem right away. They can also place outdoor appliances like your HVAC unit or pool pump away from bedrooms and quiet spaces with a well thought out plan. Keeping the garage and the driveway on the opposite side of where the bedrooms are located whenever possible is also a good best-practice for minimizing the impact of sound. 

Materials. There are various substances that can sound-deaden, refract, or reflect sound, and even absorb sound. Having a conversation with your team of professionals about this at the beginning of your journey will save you time and frustration later and allow them to navigate this potential challenge from day one. 

Airborne Noise

Now you have a fancy term for all of the sounds that take place inside your home – and your neighbors’ homes for that matter, airborne noises. Here are just some examples:

 

  • Appliance sounds
  • TV playing
  • Music
  • Floors creaking
  • HVAC 
  • Pools

And there are coinciding impact noises like doors banging, furniture scraping, etc. You may not have considered the overall volume in your neighborhood, so we suggest visiting at different times of the day. Maybe you’ll catch the sounds of a party, the hum of various dryers running, or the notes of laughter from neighboring children at play. Just notice what you hear so you can report back to your home design team. Here’s where the good news starts! There are practically unlimited ways to mitigate the noise.

Fences. Sound deadening can start in your landscape design. Solid wood fencing or cement or brick masonry walls tend to be some of the best materials for blocking out noise. Plus, they can still honor the overall look you want your home to embody. If you’re going green wherever possible, you can opt for a privacy wall made of shrubs or trees like hollies, junipers, or evergreen shrubs. 

Arrangement. If you have a teenager then insulation is important. From foam to wood-fiber panels to decorative acoustic panels, your options are vast. Plan on keeping their room away from younger children, even though it’s a somewhat short-term need, it’s one we don’t recommend taking lightly.  

From airflow noise to blaring bass notes, where there’s a chance that noise could interfere with the peace of your home – there is a solution! The best NJ architects know how to build you a home that keeps in the joy and keeps out the noise.